The fishing village of Sperlonga

Italy is a country with over 7,000 kilometers of coastline, due to its unique geology and its location; so, a lot of beautiful and romantic seaside villages characterize it, from north to south and the islands.

The Golden Scope today has chosen to tell you about a village that is located halfway between the cities of Naples and Rome, exactly in the southern Lazio in the province of Latina. It is Sperlonga.

It stands on a rock and, thanks to this excellent location, offers romantic landscapes on the Tyrrhenian Sea with rocky coves, only accessible from the sea, and sunsets with indescribable colors…

On the territory it has been found traces of human activity dating back to the Upper Palaeolithic and in Roman times several noble villas were built there; among which the most famous is the one of the emperor Tiberius.

Over the centuries the inhabitants of Sperlonga had to defend themselves against pirate attacks, especially the Ottomans, the village was destroyed and they captured many people to make them slaves. For this reason Sperlonga built some watch towers in strategic locations: overlooking the sea.

For the same reason, the fishing village has its houses on the promontory; with a scheme that makes them seem embraced to defend themselves.

A series of narrow streets and staircases seem almost hiding between the houses and the rock to reappear, after twisting roads interspersed with arches, abruptly climbing to the village and back down to the sea.

Finally, the cavern of Tiberius, so named because it is a part of the emperor’s villa, it is a fascinating natural cave that was used as a summer dining room for the emperor. Originally it was decorated with mosaic glass and marble tiles depicting the mythical exploits of Ulysses. These marvelous fragments, was been found in 1957, and now are housed in the National Archaeological Museum of Sperlonga.

 

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(All the photos are taken from Google.com, all the videos are taken from YouTube.com, and all belong to their original owners)